Show your support for food education in every school!

Food Education in the U.S. Food skills are one of the most valuable life skills you can ever learn and every child should learn about food, where it comes from and how it affects his or her body. This map highlights some food and nutrition education activities taking place in schools across the United States, from mandatory nutrition education to hands-on programs where kids can touch, feel, taste, and cook food. We know there are loads more programs in action, and we want to hear about them! Get in touch with us at foodday@cspinet.org and let us know about your food education program, class, or activity! Click here for the campaign landing page.

Campaign Announcement Press Release July 8, 2013

Ending Food Ignorance: Education Is Too Important to Leave to Big Food, Huffington Post Op-Ed July 8, 2013

About the Campaign

Get Food Education in Every School is a national initiative created by Food Day and the Jamie Oliver Food Foundation to raise awareness about the critical importance of food education in schools across America.

It provides a chance to start talking about how food education should be an integrated part of the school curriculum, and that hands-on cooking and essential food skills should be taught to every child, at every school in the country.

If every child had the opportunity to learn about, grow and cook food and understand the implications of food waste on the wider community, we believe they’d have the knowledge and tools to lead healthier and more fulfilling lives. Studies show that:

  • The more children learn about food and nutrition, the more likely they are to eat fruit and vegetables.
  • The more children cook and prepare fresh food from scratch, the more likely they are to appreciate healthier and more varied ingredients.
  • The more children plant and harvest fruit and vegetables, the more motivated they’ll be to eat them also.

Providing our children with food education has never been more vitally important as it is today. One-third of children in the United States are overweight or obese and total healthcare costs attributable to obesity could reach up to $957 billion by 2030. At the same time, 17 million children in the US remain hungry. What is more, as a result of obesity-related disease, this generation of children are predicted to be the first to die at a younger age than their parents.

 

What can we do to reverse these trends?

Schools, together with local communities and families, need to be at the heart of food education, to teach children about food, where it comes from and how it affects our bodies and therefore, to put the tools of prevention in the hands of children themselves.

Schools not only play an important role in helping to shape the next generation, they’re responsible for teaching essential skills and knowledge, such as reading, writing, computer literacy and mathematics. Cooking skills and food knowledge, however, are clearly not prioritized like these subjects, or even considered to be essential skills. Our campaign aims to reverse this trend.

We invite you and your organization to join us in the essential mission of reversing this trend and creating a food literate society – sign on to support and share your belief that food education should be available for every child, in every school in America.

Get Food Education in Every School started as an initiative to raise awareness about the importance of food education. Together we will build a broad base of support and decide on next steps to advance the issue in our nation's schools.

 

Supporters

The Abundance Project

American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences

American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences, University of Akron Campus Chapter

American College of Lifestyle Medicine

American Medical Students Association

Arizona Department of Health Services

Beecher's Flagship Foundation

Bolthouse Farms

Brain Child Press

California Food Literacy Center

Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood

Center for Ecoliteracy

Central Coast Grown

ChangeLab Solutions

Chef Ann Foundation

Columbia Midlands Dietetic Association

Common Threads Farm

Cooking with Kids, Inc.

Create a Change Now

The Creative Kitchen

Culinary Ride

The Donna Krech Companies

Dunk the Junk

Earthbox

Eco-Schools US

The Edible Schoolyard Project

Elm City Market

Energy Up!

Fair Food Matters

Family, Career and Community Leaders of America

Family Cook Productions

FEAST Asheville

Fitness Solution 24/7

Food Day

Food, Facts and Fads

The Food Trust

Gardeneers

Growing Gardens

Growing Great Schools

Grow Pittsburgh

Happy Family Brands

Hazon

HealthCorps

Healthy Moves

Healthy Kids Ideas Exchange

Holistic Moms Network

Jamie Oliver Food Foundation

Journey Gym

Kadi Fit

The Kids Cook Monday!

Kids Food Festival

Kids Wealth Institute

Lean and Green Kids

Les Dames D'Escoffier, Green Tables Initiative

Let's Move Pittsburgh

Lima Allen County Neighborhoods in Partnership

Lima Young Professionals

Little People's Center

Locally Delicious

Mill Valley Children's Garden

Montezuma School to Farm Project

National Association of Nutrition Professionals   

National Black Child Development Institute

National Farm to School Network

Nourish

Nurture

Outgrowing Hunger

Parks Elementary

Real Food for Kids

Real Food for Kids - Montgomery

Recipe for Success Foundation

Southern Obesity Prevention Strategy/Southern Obesity Summit

Super Sprowtz

Teachers College Columbia University, Program in Nutrition, Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education, & Policy

TEAM Fit Magazine

TERI, Inc.

Thin&Healthy’s Total Solution

Transition Lima

The Tree of Life Sanctuary

Veggiecation

VEGGIE U

Wellness in the Schools

TheWELLTHY

Willpower, LLC

WorldLink/Nourish

 

Kate Adamick, Co-Founder, Cook for America   

Isobel R. Contento, PhD, Teachers College Columbia University    

Chef Ann Cooper, Director, Food Services Boulder Valley School District

Diane Hatz, Founder & Executive Director, Change Food; Organizer/Curator, TEDxManhattan

Pamela Koch, EdD, RD, Teachers College Columbia University

Robyn O'Brien, founder, AllergyKids

Bettina Elias Siegel, writer of The Lunch Tray

Walter Willett, MD, DrPH, Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health 

 

Resources

Promising practices in food education around the country range from interdisciplinary classroom and garden education to cooking classes. If you’re looking for a way to make a difference in the way your students eat and think about food, here are some resources to get you started.

Join the conversation online at #FoodEd, send us your food education stories to foodday@cspinet.org, and check out the Pinterest board for more.

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Showing 15 reactions

commented 2014-09-23 13:47:36 -0400 · Flag
I’m so thankful for this effort and all the eaters involved! Real food education is a large part of my practice and website at http://abundant-wellness.net/!
I’m planning a more “world-wide” event on the web: I’ll be focusing on FoodDay2014 from 9/24 – 10/24 through the site, https://www.facebook.com/AbundantWell, https://twitter.com/abundantwell, https://www.youtube.com/user/RealLifeNatural, Google+, Pinterest & more.
Thanks to all involved!
commented 2014-09-14 01:28:47 -0400 · Flag
Great list of resources, my favorite is VeggieU. I plan on sharing some of these sites on my health blog http://healthcareerexplorer.com/
commented 2014-04-02 09:16:09 -0400 · Flag
very informative
commented 2014-03-05 20:54:55 -0500 · Flag
As part of our FCCLA (Family, Career, Community Leaders of America) club week at our high school, my students prepared cards comparing healthy snack alternatives to common snacks. We then gave away free samples of the healthy alternatives during the lunch hour and talked to the students about healthier choices. We also had a student-led workshop where students signed up to learn how to prepare healthy foods. My FCCLA kids taught others how to cook these healthy snacks and then let everyone participating eat what they made. Baby steps, but steps forward!
commented 2014-02-26 05:51:44 -0500 · Flag
Lets celebrate this New years as A year of “Don’t Waste Food”. We have seen that in several parties and functions almost 40 to 50% meals are wasted. Its just not on the such kind of the events but if we notice then we will realize that a good percentage of food is wasted by us on the daily routine. In last few years People are more concern about the food and the way by adopting which they can preserve the food. It duty of all us to play significant role to meet the challenge of hunger. So the dream of good future can be obtained. http://small-fridge.net/ always Say Thanks to Food day type organization which are playing a leading role in that context.
commented 2013-11-24 09:01:52 -0500 · Flag
TY :)
commented 2013-11-24 09:01:10 -0500 · Flag
TY :)
commented 2013-10-03 08:52:57 -0400 · Flag
Great for the American people, great for the rest of the Earth.
As a teacher of undergraduate Biology and Environmental Science, this is very important for me personally. I would love to have my children grow up in a school with a sustainable food system. So I would love to learn more from food day.org.
Neil Ian P. Lumanlan
University of Santo Tomas.
Manila, Philippines
commented 2013-10-03 05:44:24 -0400 · Flag
Great to see Jack and Jamie teamed up. Like me, Jamie is an english lad. He’s low-key famous as a TV chef, a campervan family man, nice kid. He went up against the dense inertia of English cultural attitude, fighting and beating the morgue that is our education system. My kids eat great thanks to Jamie, and my Mind stays sane thanks to Jack. A great team! All the best to you all!!
followed this page 2013-09-24 01:04:27 -0400
commented 2013-09-24 01:03:03 -0400 · Flag
The quality of the food are proportional to quality of the life, so…….the future of the humanity depends of that !!!
commented 2013-07-10 21:41:34 -0400 · Flag
The value and quality of the food we and our children ingest will determine the equal value and quality of our future.
commented 2013-06-18 14:47:20 -0400 · Flag
Hi Cindy,

It’s great to hear that you’re interested in bringing food education to schools in your community. At this time, the Get Food Education in Every School campaign is focused specifically in the United States, though many of the resources and curricula listed on the educational resources document can be adopted for classrooms outside of the United States. We hope you’ll continue to stay tuned as we grow the campaign!

- Avi, Food Day Staff
commented 2013-06-08 10:49:06 -0400 · Flag
This site is intended for American Schools, well I live in Canada, shouldn’t their be resources for my country as well.