What’s in a bowl?

By Ashley Hieb, Corporate Partnerships Coordinator

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The highest rate of childhood hunger in the country. One of the five worst places for senior hunger in the U.S. Eleven percent increase in those receiving hunger relief services over 2010, despite the economy improving. Surely these statistics can’t describe our nation’s capital, a place known for its prosperity and wealth, right?


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Broccolini with Lemon Parmesan Sauce

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Ingredients

  • - 1 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
  • - 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • - 1 lb. broccolini, chopped
  • - 1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice
  • - 1 Tbs. mayonnaise
  • - 3 Tbs. parmesan cheese
  • - freshly ground black pepper

Directions

  • - Heat a large sauté pan over medium heat until hot enough for a drop of water to sizzle.
  • - Add the oil and sauté the garlic until golden, stirring constantly, about 1 minute.
  • - Add the broccolini to the pan with 1⁄4 cup of water. Turn the heat to high and allow the water to steam the broccolini until tender and all the water has evaporated, about 2 minutes. Add up to another 1⁄4 cup of water if the pan is dry before the broccolini is tender.
  • - In a small bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, mayonnaise, parmesan, and black pepper.
  • - Drizzle over the broccolini. Serves 4.

Nutrition information

Per serving (1 cup):

  • Calories: 110
  • Total fat: 8 g
  • Sat fat: 1.5 g
  • Protein: 5 g
  • Sodium: 110 mg
  • Carbohydrates: 7 g
  • Fiber: 3 g

Kate Sherwood is the culinary director and executive chef for NutritionAction.com® and Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) in Washington, D.C. Trained at the Culinary Institute of America, Kate has been a freelance food stylist at The Food Network, Discovery, “The Today Show,” and Martha Stewart, where she worked with many television chefs, including Bobby Flay, Emeril Lagasse, Rachel Ray, Giada de Laurentis, and Alton Brown. Prior to joining CSPI and NutritionAction.com®, Kate worked as a researcher for Dan Barber at Stone Barns Center for Food & Agriculture, where she focused on sustainable food systems.

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Artichoke Sauté

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Ingredients

  • - 9 oz. frozen artichoke hearts, thawed, drained, and patted dry
  • - 4 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • - 8 oz. shiitake mushrooms, caps sliced, stems discarded
  • - 1 15 oz. can no-salt-added chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • - 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • - 2 scallions, sliced
  • - 6 sprigs Italian parsley, chopped
  • - 1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice, more to taste
  • - 1⁄2 tsp. kosher salt

Directions

  • - In a large non-stick skillet, sauté the artichokes in 1 Tbs. oil until browned. Remove from the pan. Sauté the mushrooms in 1 Tbs. oil until browned. Remove from the pan. Sauté the chickpeas in 1 Tbs. oil until lightly browned.
  • - Add the remaining 1 Tbs. oil, stir in the garlic, and cook for 30 seconds. Return the artichokes and mushrooms to the pan and heat through. Add the scallions and parsley. Season with lemon juice and up to 1⁄2 tsp. salt. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information

Per serving (1 cup):

  • Calories: 290
  • Total Fat: 6 g
  • Sat Fat: 2 g
  • Protein: 9 g
  • Sodium: 310 mg
  • Cholesterol: 0 mg
  • Carbohydrates: 30 g
  • Fiber: 10 g

Kate Sherwood is the culinary director and executive chef for NutritionAction.com® and Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) in Washington, D.C. Trained at the Culinary Institute of America, Kate has been a freelance food stylist at The Food Network, Discovery, “The Today Show,” and Martha Stewart, where she worked with many television chefs, including Bobby Flay, Emeril Lagasse, Rachel Ray, Giada de Laurentis, and Alton Brown. Prior to joining CSPI and NutritionAction.com®, Kate worked as a researcher for Dan Barber at Stone Barns Center for Food & Agriculture, where she focused on sustainable food systems.

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Beef: The ''King'' of the Big Water Footprints

In a country like the United States, a fifth of all your grain production is dependent upon irrigation. For every pound of beef produced in the industrial system, it takes two thousand gallons of water. That is a lot of water and there is plenty of evidence that the Earth cannot keep up with the demand.

Compared to the water footprint of almost any other agricultural product, the water footprint of beef is orders of magnitudes greater. Beef is truly the "king" of big water footprints.

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Since the water requirements for beef can be so enormous, it makes sense that people want to get to the bottom of the aforementioned debate. This decades-long cold war of sorts in the agricultural and natural resource arenas has pitted Big Ag supporters against sustainable farmers, environmentalists and various academics against one another, each armed with their own numbers and studies. With the addition of big money from big industry, we've ended up with quite the grudge match over America’s second favorite meat.

The bottom line is that it takes a lot of water to produce beef, especially when just a fraction of that water can be used to produce much more food with much lower water footprints.

For the full article, please click here.


GRACE Communications Foundation develops innovative strategies to increase public awareness of the critical environmental and public health issues created by our current food, water and energy systems, and to promote a more sustainable future.

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Eat and Drink Your Greens!

Eat and Drink Your Greens! 

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Rainbow Pasta

The Kids Cook Monday is a campaign that encourages parents and kids to start their weeks off right by making Monday family night. Each week, the campaign provides an easy weeknight recipe and all the tools families will need to enjoy a fun cooking and dining experience on Monday nights. To have The Family Dinner Date Newsletter delivered to your inbox each Friday, sign up here.

This dish is like the seasons, ever changing! Pair your favorite pasta with whatever you find in season at the market. This recipe comes to us from Kids Cook Monday Ambassador Teeny Tiny Foodie


 Serves 6-8

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Ingredients:

  • - 1 pound whole wheat pasta such as penne, shells or farfalle
  • - 3/4 pint cherry or grape tomatoes, cut into quarters
  • - 2 carrots, peeled and grated
  • - 1-2 cups baby spinach, roughly chopped
  • - 3/4 cup corn, drained if canned, thawed if frozen, or cut from 2 ears fresh
  • - 3/4 cup purple cauliflower, finely chopped*
  • - 6 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese, cut or torn into 1/2-inch chunks
  • - 2 ounces parmesan or locatelli cheese, grated or shredded
  • - Small handful fresh herbs, finely chopped (basil, chives and/or parsley)
  • - 4 teaspoons olive oil
  • - Salt, pepper, garlic powder, to taste
  • - *substitute white cauliflower if not available

Directions:

Adult: Fill a large, lidded pot with water, add 1 teaspoon of olive oil and 2 pinches of salt to the water, cover and bring it to a boil. Cook the pasta according to the directions on the box. Once it is cooked, drain it and pour the pasta into a large bowl.

Kid: Add 2 teaspoons of olive oil, a few pinches of salt and garlic pepper and a pinch of black pepper to the pasta.

Kid: Mix together. Add in the vegetables and the remaining olive oil, if needed, and mix it all together. Add the cheeses and herbs and mix again.

Together: Taste, adjust spices and herbs as desired and enjoy!


Food for Thought: A great way to get kids excited about trying new foods is to involve them in the process. Let your children pick out the colors in this rainbow pasta and they are more likely to want to eat it with you! Summer is a great time of year to get started since the stores and markets are at their most vibrant. Feeling adventurous? Plant your own garden this year!

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Cooking Tip of the Week: If it’s too hot outside to think about eating a warm meal, you don't have to! Chill the pasta for at least 15 minutes while you prepare the rest of the meal and serve as a cold pasta salad.


Videos:

Corn on the Cob Tip:

Summer Gardening:


Cook Up Conversation

Launch fun family conversations with imaginative ideas. 

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Educate and Entertain

Download this puzzle about shopping at the farmers market!

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Lincoln Digs in the Dirt to Help Feed the Hungry

"Mom, can I take this cucumber home and eat it?" - Lincoln, five-year-old volunteer at The Giving Field

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